[ back ]      go back  
 Michigan Marijuana Law
Conditional Drugged Driving * Details 
  Incarceration Fine 
Possession
Marijuana use* misdemeanor 90 days $100
Any amount* misdemeanor 1 year $2,000
In a park* misdemeanor or felony 2 years $2,000
*Conditional discharge possible.
Cultivation
Less than 20 plants felony 4 years $20,000
20 to 200 plants felony 7 years $500,000
200 or more plants felony 15 years $10,000,000
Sale
Distribution without remuneration misdemeanor 1 year $1,000
Less than 5 kg felony 4 years $20,000
5 to 45 kg felony 7 years $500,000
45 kg or more felony 15 years $10,000,000
Miscellaneous (paraphernalia, license suspensions, drug tax stamps, etc...)
Paraphernalia sale** misdemeanor 90 days $5,000
**Preceded by cease and desist order, and if complied with, it is a complete defense to the charges.

[ top ]

Details

The penalty for the use of marijuana is up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $100.

Possession of marijuana in any amount is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,000, unless the possession occurred in a public or private park, which increases the penalty to a possible 2 years in prison.

Conditional discharge is available in all use and possession cases.

Distribution of marijuana without remuneration is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. For cultivation of less than 20 plants or sale of less than 5 kilograms, the punishment is up to four years in jail and a fine of up to $20,000. For cultivation of 20 or more plants or sale of 5 kilograms or more, the punishment is up to seven years in prison and a fine up to $500,000. Cultivation of 200 or more plants or sale of 45 kilograms or more is punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000,000.

The sale of paraphernalia is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $5,000. The arrest for sale of paraphernalia is preceded by a cease and desist order, and if the order is complied with, it is a complete defense to the charges.

[ top ]

Conditional release: The state allows conditional release or alternative or diversion sentencing for people facing their first prosecutions. Usually, conditional release lets a person opt for probation rather than trial. After successfully completing probation, the individual's criminal record does not reflect the charge.

Drugged driving: This state has a zero tolerance per se drugged driving law enacted. In their strictest form, these laws forbid drivers from operating a motor vehicle if they have any detectable level of an illicit drug or drug metabolite (i.e., compounds produced from chemical changes of a drug in the body, but not necessarily psychoactive themselves) present in their bodily fluids.

[ top ]